Call for papers

The JACAC is an academic design journal founded in July 2023, which distributes high-quality, original research and operates worldwide academic journals with peer-review and open access (print and online simultaneous publication semi-annual issues).

Thematic research articles, literature reviews, and book reviews are the three types of original articles accepted by the journal. The subjects covering the fields of ancient Chinese painting, sculpture, calligraphy, handicrafts and so on. JACAC aims to share the arts and crafts culture, thought and theory of ancient China, disseminate the brilliant achievements of ancient Chinese  arts and crafts culture, promote the study of ancient Chinese arts and crafts culture, and strive to be in the leading position in this field. The primary goal of JACAC focus on academic research rather than profit-making.

Submit your manuscript: jaca.editorialmanager01@gmail.com


See Instructions for authors for manuscript requirements. 


May 6th, 2023

Latest articles


Journal of Ancient Chinese Arts and Crafts (JACAC) is an international academic journal published by MSPL. JACAC impliments peer-reviewed, open access policy for original articles, and published twice a year in both print and online formats.


JACAC is an academic platform dedicated to the dissemination of ancient Chinese arts and crafts culture, covering the fields of ancient Chinese painting, sculpture, calligraphy, handicrafts and so on. JACAC aims to share the arts and crafts culture, thought and theory of ancient China, disseminate the brilliant achievements of ancient Chinese arts and crafts, promote the study of ancient Chinese arts and crafts culture, and strive to be in the leading position in this field. The primary goal of JACAC focus on academic research rather than profit-making. 


Researchers from different fields are welcome to submit manuscripts.

Open Access
Design Research
Open Access

Abstract: The patterns and characteristics of mountains have appeared in portraits since the Shang and Zhou dynasties. The patterns of mountains in the Han dynasty depicted the real world, expressed reverence and belief in the immortal realm and were in a transitional stage of aesthetic consciousness in the metaphysics of mountains and forests. The mountains in the realistic landscape reflect life and aesthetically reflect the ideal schema of heaven and earth. Ritual symbols use fixed patterns of mountains, hunting, and war to depict the rituals of offering sacrifices to the heavens and mountains, as well as the bestowal of divine orders and mountain sacrifices. Famous mountains and rivers were the places where immortals lived in the popular imagination of the Han Dynasty. The belief in “immortality” formed two major mythological systems in the east and west, represented by the “Kunlun Mountains” and the “Three Mountains on the Sea,” which gave rise to a series of mountain patterns associated with each mythological system. In the context of etiquette and symbolism, the Han Dynasty depiction of mountain patterns developed into diversified forms, reflecting the traditional Chinese natural aesthetic approach in which “landscape painting expresses the artistic conception of the Tao through formal beauty.”


JACAC 20231(1), 33-48; https://doi.org/10.59528/ms.jacac2023.1122a3 - November 22, 2023


 

Keywords: Han Portrait Mountain Pattern; Natural Aesthetic Observation; Symbolic Ritual; Ascension Belief

Fang Lan * 

by

PUBLISHED BY MICHELANGELO SCHOLAR PUBLISH LIMITED

ADDRESS: ROOM A, 3/F., WING TAT COMMERCIAL BUILDING, 121-125 WING LOK STREET, SHEUNG WAN HK

TEL: 00852-36197566 

FAX: 00852-36197558


Open Access


JACAC 20231(1), 49-58; https://doi.org/10.59528/ms.jacac2023.1231a4 - December 31, 2023

 

Qinzeng Li*  

Abstract: A post script written by Li Deyu on the “Emperor Taizong Receiving the Tibetan Envoy” (步辇图) records events such as Tang Taizong’s appointment of an official position and arrangement of marriage to Lu Dongzan, as well as Lu Dongzan’s refusal to accept Tang Taizong’s arrangement. The historical source of these events is not the Annals of Emperor Taizong verified by Fu Xuancong and Zhou Jianguo but rather the “Legend of Tang Taizong’s Nine Tests of Tibetan Welcoming Envoys,” which Li sent people to collect during his tenure as the Jiedushi of Xichuan in Jiannan. Later, it was included in his book Record of Defending the Southwest Frontier. This legend became popular because of the deification and reshaping activities of Lu Dongzan and his sons during their period of monopolizing power. As a result, the series of events recorded by Li Deyu in his postscript were able to enter the “Tibetan Biography” of orthodox historical books such as Old Book of Tang, Tang Huiyao, New Book of Tang, Zizhi Tongjian, Zizhi Tongjian Kaoyi, and Cefu Yuangui, becoming the so-called “true and credible history.”

by

Design Research
Keywords: Li Deyu; Emperor Taizong Receiving the Tibetan Envoy(步辇图); Emperor Taizong of Tang; Lu Dongzan; Tubo
Keywords: Landscape woodblock prints; Landscape paintings; Maps; Artistic geography

Abstract: The collection “Landscape Woodblock Prints of the Ming and Qing Dynasties” treats landscape woodblock prints as a distinct category, systematically organizing and presenting them in chronological order to showcase their development and evolution, and geographically to reveal regional differences. This approach promotes the independence of traditional Chinese prints in art history, elevating their status and influence. In Chinese history, the division of labor and cooperation in printmaking allowed both literati and professional painters to participate in print creation, contributing to the improvement of the art form. Landscape woodblock prints not only have the indicative function of landscape maps but also possess the artistic characteristics of landscape paintings, representing a pictorial form that bridges and draws from both. Ancient landscape woodblock prints and landscape paintings complement each other and provide mutual support in both creation and research. Landscape woodblock prints are closely related to the local geography and serve as important supporting materials for advancing the study of artistic geography. Compared to landscape paintings, they hold greater significance and value in the field of artistic geography.


JACAC 20231(1), 1-14; https://doi.org/10.59528/ms.jacac2023.0802a1 - August 2, 2023

 

Yang Xiangmin*  

by

Design Research
Open Access
Keywords: Calligraphic techniques in painting (以书入画); Imagery (意象); Calligraphy of Preface and postscript (题跋); Tranquility and Relaxation (尚逸)

Abstract: The way of “writing” (写) is one of the characteristics of pen-and-ink expression in Chinese literati painting, which is prominently embodied in the aesthetic ideology and the paintings of the Yuan dynasty painter Ni Zan. Ni Zan’s principle and practice of “writing” painting is rooted both in his inheritance of the pen-and-ink traditions of the Song and Yuan literati painters and in the following concepts in the history of painting: “a common origin for Chinese painting and calligraphy,” (书画同源), “a common essence for Chinese painting and calligraphy,” (书画同体) and “a common method for Chinese painting and calligraphy” (书画同法). In Ni Zan’s paintings, he used calligraphic brushwork to capture the romantic charm of the objects, which was a free expression of his true feelings and a means of self-entertainment. At the same time, his painting and calligraphy were influenced by the social trend emphasizing the “integration of literature and art” (文艺相融) in the Yuan Dynasty, resulting in a high degree of internal consistency among pen-and-ink performance, creative approaches and aesthetic style. Consequently, there was a certain degree of inevitability to the introduction of a “writing” style into his paintings. Ni Zan’s calligraphy and painting are intertwined and integrated, presenting the visual characteristics of the same brushwork. The principle of blank space is similar in both calligraphy and painting, and the same common principles apply to ink intensity and a carefree style. More importantly, “writing” (写) in his paintings, as a way of conveying the language of Ni Zan’s pen-and-ink style, also embodies the character of high elegance, which made the pursuit of a written mood in pen-and-ink paintings a common goal of literati paintings throughout the Ming and Qing dynasties.


JACAC 20231(1), 15-32; https://doi.org/10.59528/ms.jacac2023.0926a2 - September 26, 2023


 

Xiaofei Pang *  

by

Design Research
Open Access


JACAC 20231(1), 18-26;  - June 24, 2023


 

Liang Zhu *  



Internal factors and External influences in the Evolution of Chinese Folk Concepts of Creation - The Art of Paper Cutting by Gao Fenglian as an Example

by

Abstract: The collection "Landscape Prints of the Ming and Qing Dynasties" treats landscape prints as a distinct category, systematically organizing and presenting them in chronological order to showcase their development and evolution, and geographically to reveal regional differences. This approach promotes the independence of traditional Chinese prints in art history, elevating their status and influence. In Chinese history, the division of labor and cooperation in printmaking allowed both literati and professional painters to participate in print creation, contributing to the improvement of the art form. Landscape prints not only have the indicative function of landscape maps but also possess the artistic characteristics of landscape paintings, representing a pictorial form that bridges and draws from both. Ancient landscape prints and landscape paintings complement each other and provide mutual support in both creation and research. Landscape prints are closely related to the local geography and serve as important supporting materials for advancing the study of artistic geography. Compared to landscape paintings, they hold greater significance and value in the field of artistic geography.

Updating
Design Research
Keywords: Chinese folk decorative arts; Gao Fenglian; paper-cutting; Changes in perception; edification in rites and music; Naturalism and moral righteousness
Open Access